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Coconut, Honey?

Floating market is not all about Mekong River. There’s much to discover along the river.

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View SEA Trip by Any Means on automidori's travel map.

Mekong River, September 2nd 2011

Let’s start from coconut, honey? Oh... honey, you come first ;-)

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You see that picture of bee there? This area is well known for its bee farm.

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This was our first stop.

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We were served with a welcome drink of honey and tea. I sat together with a Vietnamese family. I felt shy. I grabbed my cellphone to take this picture, but not my SLR camera.

Then small bottles of honey cosmetics were placed in front of us. I didn’t take a picture. Then came this man explaining about bees. So I believe, for he spoke in Vietnamese. I’ve seen this 2 years ago on my first tour to the Mekong Delta. Hmmm… but wait a minute, something’s rather different. Sheepishly I took out my camera and shot. Blur. The thing this man is holding in his right hand, I didn't see 2 years ago.

Oh ya, the honey tea was good. I wish I got a bigger cup :D

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The restaurant also sold honey for cosmetic. This is the sheet explaining the benefits of honey. My eyes bumped into the words: "To beautiful". Aha!

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Now, about the coconut production. It wasn’t until then that I saw fellow European tourist shooting with an SLR, although not as big as mine. I began to gain confidence. Look, our tour guide is demonstrating how to peel the coconut of its shell. I’ve seen that, too. Just shoot.

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From here on it’s not the same as what had seen in 2009. The factory I saw in 2009 was all automatic. Here’s a tool to slice the coconut.

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And then the equipment to extract the coconut juice.

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Now the coconut juice already mixed with sugar, is boiled while constantly being stirred.

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Next step, the cooked coconut juice fills long molds like this. Some of them have been given additive color of light green.

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When the coconut bars are dry and hard, the workers slice them into small squares, and wrap them one by one.

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To ensure all coconut bars come in regular size, three by three are thrust into this tin mold.

Posted by automidori 04:48 Archived in Vietnam Tagged vietnam mekong_river

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